Quilceda Creek Cabernet Sauvignon 2002

$219.00

SKU C0256

750ml

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Category Red Wine
Varietal
Country United States
Region Washington
Appellation Columbia Valley
Brand Quilceda Creek
  • we97

Wine EnthusiastAmazing density; the aromas billow up from the glass and weave together sinuously, taking you on a magic carpet ride before the wine even hits your mouth. This wine has the power of a monster California Cab while retaining the subtlety of a first-growth Bordeaux. It is just a massive blast of dark fruit, incredible viscosity, silky textures and soft herbs, pepper and spice. The oak-all new, all French-is unobtrusive and perfectly integrated.

Paul Gregutt, December 15, 2005
  • ws93

Wine SpectatorFirm and taut, with dusky spice and freshly ground pepper nuances to the dark berry, currant and cherry aromas and flavors, lingering impressively on the chewy finish. Doesn't have the pure fruit of previous vintages, but it should soften and broaden, developing more depth with cellaring. Best from 2008 through 2015. 3,400 cases made.

Harvey Steiman, November 30, 2005
  • wa100

Wine AdvocateUnlike some minuscule production "cult" wines or luxury cuvees culled from a winery's primary product that have earned perfect scores over the years, Quilceda Creek's Cabernet Sauvignon is the winery's raison d'etre and is produced in significant quantities (3,400 cases in 2002, 3,425 in 2003). For accomplishing this feat the Golitzens should be doubly proud. Dark ruby-colored and sporting a nose of violets, sweet blueberries, dark cherries, and slight undertones of asphalt, the 2002 Cabernet Sauvignon blossoms on the palate to expose a wine of ethereal delicacy yet immense power. Medium to full-bodied, it expands to reveal concentrated layers of cassis, blackberries, red cherries, raspberries, violets, spices, and touches of candied plums. This rich, exquisitely balanced, sweet, and broad wine is harmonious, graceful, and awesomely long. Projected maturity: now-2022. Congratulations Alex and Paul, welcome to the big leagues.

Pierre Rovani, April 2006